Posts Tagged ‘eat healthy’

March 18th, 2016
Feeding the crew from the new pressure cooker in Joplin.

Feeding the crew from the new pressure cooker in Joplin.

It’s no secret that simple is best when preparing dinner in the cab while you’re on the road. So why not try dinner under pressure – with a pressure cooker?

Pressure cookers are different from slow cookers in that everything about the pressure cooker is fast! Pressure cookers use the pressure from the steam that quickly builds up to cook your meat and rice and other ingredients in a fraction of the time it would take to cook it normally on a stove top or in an oven.  The pressure that builds up enables you to cook quickly, at higher heat, and keeps moisture in the meat you might use!  Don’t have a pressure cooker?  They differ in size and capacity and there are a good range of options out there and they aren’t very expensive.

As with anything, there are a million recipes online for pressure cookers but we found some good ones with fewer or less complicated ingredients that make a tasty dinner with leftovers.

Columbian Chicken Stew from Serious Eats: Chicken, Potatoes, Tomatoes, Onion and Bay leaf.

Easy Minestrone Soup with Tortellini from food.com: Some fresh and some store bought ingredients make this easily attainable and home and hearty dinner.

Barbecue Chicken from allrecipes.com: Six ingredients plus add hot sauce if you like it spicier.

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast from allrecipes.com: Easy to find ingredients and it makes its own gravy.

Congratulations to the Truckload driver who won a pressure cooker from the monthly Driver Safety and Awards ceremony on March 4!  He shared the wealth and made pork chops and rice for the local Joplin, MO crew.

March 18th, 2014

From Eating Well

Packed with protein and fiber, this tuna and bean salad is ready in a flash. For an extra kick, add a pinch of crushed red pepper or cayenne.

Ingredients
1 15- to 19-ounce can beans, such as chickpeas, black-eyed peas or kidney beans, rinsed
2 5- to 6-ounce cans water-packed chunk light tuna, drained and flaked (see Note)
1 large red bell pepper, finely diced
1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley, divided
4 teaspoons capers, rinsed
1 1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh rosemary
1/2 cup lemon juice, divided
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
1/4 teaspoon salt
8 cups mixed salad greens

Preparation
Combine beans, tuna, bell pepper, onion, parsley, capers, rosemary, 1/4 cup lemon juice and 2 tablespoons oil in a medium bowl. Season with pepper. Combine the remaining 1/4 cup lemon juice, 2 tablespoons oil and salt in a large bowl. Add salad greens; toss to coat. Divide the greens among 4 plates. Top each with the tuna salad.

Tips & Notes
Note: Chunk light tuna, which comes from the smaller skipjack or yellowfin, has less mercury than canned white albacore tuna. The FDA/EPA advises that women who are or might become pregnant, nursing mothers and young children consume no more than 6 ounces of albacore a week; up to 12 ounces of canned light tuna is considered safe.

Nutrition
Per serving: 290 calories; 16 g fat ( 2 g sat , 11 g mono ); 12 mg cholesterol; 28 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 9 g fiber; 505 mg sodium; 638 mg potassium.

November 2nd, 2013

Source: WellnessCoachesUSA.com

With nearly 26 million people in the U.S. living with diabetes, a disease that occurs when blood sugar levels consistently stay above normal levels, and another 79 million at high risk for developing Type II diabetes, the disease is taking a physical, emotional and financial toll on our country. Yet, most don’t consider diabetes a serious matter.

Recent numbers provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show a different story:

• Every 17 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes.
• Diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined.
• 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless we take steps to stop diabetes.

Now is the time to act. Have you had your blood sugar tested recently? Your doctor can administer the test during a regular exam. Your sugar level should be tested if you’re experiencing:

• Frequent urination
• Unusual thirst
• Extreme hunger
• Extreme fatigue and irritability
• Frequent infections
• Blurred vision

While Type I diabetes occurs mainly in childhood or adolescent years, Type II diabetes affects adults and is considered to be primarily due to lifestyle. To help prevent the development of Type II diabetes, follow these tips:

• Maintain a healthy diet
• Eat healthy carbohydrates, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy products
• Avoid saturated and trans fats
• Limit sugar intake
• Limit alcohol consumption
• Exercise regularly – aim for 2.5 hours a week

For more details, visit diabetes.org.