Paralysis of Analysis

Written by: on April 6th, 2017

“New year, New you!”

The beginning of each year brings about a renewed energy and high hopes for a healthier lifestyle and an overall better self. Many of us dive deep in the information superhighway surfing through articles on the best training routine and latest diet or cleanse. Spring fashions bring the coolest workout wear.

We ask coworkers and friends about their gym experience and receive a myriad of stories.  We ask, we read, we compare, we read more blogs, we listen to others and take notes. We are amazed by before and after pictures online. We like what we heard and we pull up the YouTube video and watch multiple videos. We check Facebook feed and notice suggestive selling items which weren’t there before. Navigating health and fitness blogs has made you a target to marketers. We see gadgets, protein shakes, pre-workouts, vitamins, trainers and exercise machines. 

We were close to a decision on which program to follow, but now….we’re not entirely sure. So, we click on that suggested link for a different blog with a different diet and training plan. We read and we watch and we take notes. They seem to make sense, we like them too.    

This pattern can extend for days and our good intentions begin to subdue under incessant bombarding of information. We are exhausted and confused. There are multiple directions and schools of thought on how to proceed. We’re not sure, we know we want to improve and we don’t want to break the bank. 

Well, maybe I should look into this other thing here…..STOP

This is a classic example of paralysis of analysis. It is a great move to be informed because you don’t want to get hurt by jumping into a CrossFit class only to find it is unsustainable and abandon it immediately. The key is to start where you are, doing what you can, with one guide. Start walking, start bicycling, start swimming, start dancing…just start and be consistent. Do not overthink it. Follow one trainers advice for 100 days. Give yourself time to see results. DO SOMETHING. Stop planning, thinking, researching, comparing, debating…put on those tennis shoes and go. Your body will thank you. Your mind will thank you. You will be amazed at the things you can do…if you just start.    

 

Remember CFI? You will.

Written by: on November 2nd, 2016

50s-truck

 

On Thursday, October 27, XPO Logistics announced it had reached an agreement with a leader in the North American transportation and logistics industry, TransForce, to purchase the company. As we return to our heritage as a standalone truckload company, it is my honor to reintroduce you to CFI, our original name which we will be bringing back as a result of this transaction.

The CFI name carries a lot meaning for both our customers and employees. The company was founded in 1951 with only two trailers. Seven years later, we purchased our first company truck. Fast forward to 2016 and we have grown to more than 2,400 trucks and more than 7,000 trailers.

Tim Hicks has been with the company since 1992, when he started as a professional driver and held various positions in our operations and planning department before accepting the position of driver advocate in March 2014. 

Prior to joining CFI, Hicks served in the United States Air Force. 

“I did a lot of research prior to separating from the USAF. This was before the Internet and Google, so I was writing and calling companies to get information or hanging out at truck stops asking drivers questions,” he said. “I would go to Oklahoma City to the Petro and one of the first things I remember seeing was the CFI trucks. Clean, red trucks with clean, white trailers. They were conventional tractors, while almost everybody was still running cab overs.” 

Hicks eventually made his way to CFI headquarters in Joplin and met with Arnie Rosa, a driver recruiter who Hicks had been communicating with. 

“Arnie told me that CFI only hired one out of every 20 drivers. It was a big deal to get on here,” he said. “[On my tour] he showed the shop and the operations department and that’s what sold me. I liked that they were what appeared to be a top-notch operation.” 

CFI hauled for companies like Ford, GM and shutting down an auto plant was unheard of.

Hicks’ first truck was an ’89 Flat Top Kenworth with a 350 Cummins and, he said, it was common for “drivers to polish chrome or to be seen lettering tires on down time.”

“I loved driving a truck back then,” he said. 

While driving a “Red Racer” didn’t hurt, he said there was something else that contributed to that feeling. 

“There was pride in the company and respect between our driving and non-driving staff, customers and our peers in the industry,” he said.

Going forward, Hicks said he hopes that current employees will feel that same pride. 

“Drivers who wanted to work hard came to work for us,” he said. “Customers who demanded premium service called us. CFI is about pride; pride in our company and in our employees, pride in our equipment and pride in our customers. I want [that] for all of us.”

 

When will you gain weight?

Written by: on October 25th, 2016

sept23

If you were to guess which day of the year you weighed the least would you pick a nice warm day in the spring or summer? Turns out, in the U.S., September 23 is the day you will likely weigh the least. That means September 24 must be a doozy and all uphill from there.

In a study conducted by Withings, a health app, one in three people will be able to maintain their weight after September 23. Using anonymous data from over 65,000 U.S. based users, a person is more likely to maintain their weight if they:

  • Weigh themselves 40% more often than the others.
  • Are 23% more active.
  • 78% of them fixed a target weight.

With a more sedentary lifestyle of driving truck, this is news to be shared. As you might expect, weight tends to vary over the course of the year, peaking in the December and January winter months. Have tips to keep from gaining weight? Share them below!