Archive for the ‘Safety’ Category

June 1st, 2015

Each year, the National Safety Council (NSC), a non-profit organization dedicated to reducing and preventing accidents, injuries and deaths, designates June as National Safety Month. For more than 100 years the NSC has conducted studies, issued reports and made recommendations focusing on important safety topics at home, in schools and in the workplace.

This year’s theme for National Safety Month is “What do you live for?” The question is intended to make us all stop and consider the things that are important in our lives, align our priorities and determine the best course of action to help us prevent incidents that would negatively impact these things.

We all spend a significant amount of time “on the job”. Let’s consider safety from a work-related viewpoint.

At Con-way Truckload safety is an essential core value and we take the safety of our team members seriously. Here’s a quick “Safety Checklist” to review each time you head out on the road

  • First of all, don’t forget to Buckle Up. It’s not just the law; it’s your best line of defense.
  • Pre-inspect your vehicle: Do a walk-around, checking load securement, tire pressure and wear and maximize you vision by making sure mirrors are properly adjusted.
  • When you’re on the road, get into a Safety Mindset. Be aware of and obey all posted speed limits and traffic signs. Drive appropriately for changing weather conditions and through construction zones.
  • Maintain a safe following distance: Check mirrors frequently and be aware of the actions of the drivers around you.
  • Avoid frequent or unnecessary lane changes: Lane changes increase the risk of an accident. Pick a lane and stay in it as long as is reasonably possible.
  • Minimize in-truck distractions: Activities such as changing CDs or radio stations, talking on your cell phone or eating, take your attention away from your driving and should be kept to a minimum.
  • Be sure to get enough sleep: Fatigue and sleep deprivation are major causes of lapses in attention, impaired judgment and reduced reaction time.
  • Don’t drive while under the influence: As often as this warning has been issued, it still bears repeating. Also, if you are taking a medication prescribed by you doctor, read the accompanying information and be aware of any possible side effects. Finally, look for driving behaviors of other motorists that may indicate they have been drinking.

Con-way Truckload drivers are among the safest and most professional in the industry. Working together, we all make the highways safer for those with whom we share the road, and for ourselves and ensure that we are all able to enjoy “The things we live for.”

One final note: The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration have scheduled Roadcheck, the annual inspection blitz, for June 2-4. Approximately 10,000 inspectors from local, state and federal law enforcement agencies at 1,500 inspection station points in North America will perform nearly 70,000 inspections on trucks and buses during this period.

what_inspectors_are_looking_for

(Click on the image above to see a larger version)

For more information on this year’s Roadcheck and a more detailed safety checklist, go to http://www.overdriveonline.com/roadcheck-2015-inspection-spree-set-for-early-june. Let’s all stay safe out there!

 

 

 

May 11th, 2015

Last month we made a big announcement that garnered a lot of positive feedback from you, our professional drivers, about our new tractors. We added 635 to the fleet, cycling them in to continually maintain one of the newest, most technically advanced and impressive fleets in the industry.

What does this mean for you? First of all, it means that we listen to you. We have been receiving feedback from drivers that twin-screw axels have better traction in inclement conditions than other tractor options, and we decided to make a change based on that feedback. Not to mention these new trucks — 575 Kenworth T680s and 60 Freightliner Cascades — have larger interiors for greater driver comfort. 

It also means that our fleet will be even safer, freeing up driver attention that may have been focused on shifting gears and placing that attention on road conditions, fellow drivers and traffic patterns.

Finally, this means that you may have more of an option when it comes to your preferred tractor set-up. Your safety, comfort and happiness is important to us.

Check out this infographic for more information about the fleet, and tell us what features you like in your tractor on our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ConwayTruckload.

 

SYH1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 16th, 2015

Since 1999, more than 170 law enforcement officers have been killed — and thousands have been injured — as a result of being on the side of the road doing their job and being struck by a distracted driver. 

In January of 2015, Oklahoma Highway Patrol Troopers Nicholas Dees and Keith Burch were working at a collision scene on I-40 when a motorist struck them. Trooper Dees died at the scene while Trooper Burch was seriously injured. The motorist — who admitted he was updating his social media at the time of the incident – is facing first-degree manslaughter charges.

On March 12, Highway Patrol Trooper Gary Sanders was conducting a routine traffic stop when a vehicle struck the back of his cruiser, pushing it into the vehicle he had pulled over. Trooper Sanders was critically injured in the incident, and is slowly recovering.

You get the picture. According to FBI statistics, officers being struck and killed by distracted drivers is a major cause of law enforcement deaths. So much so that today, all 50 states have some form of a “Move Over” law in effect.

The “Move Over” laws are simple: when you see flashing lights on the side of the road, you are required to slow down. If it’s safe, you need to move over to another lane away from police, fire crews, paramedics and tow truck drivers. These laws really should be common sense. If you see anybody on the side of the road – law enforcement, construction workers, or simply a car broken down – “Move Over” and give them some space.

According to Mason Dixon Polling and Research, sponsored by the National Safety Commission, 71 percent of Americans have not heard of “Move Over” laws. As truck drivers, you are the professionals. If you make the move into another lane to give law enforcement officers space to do their jobs, other motorists will follow.

We learned in our Smith System Training to:

  1. Aim high in steering.
  2. Get the big picture.
  3. Keep your eyes moving.
  4. Leave yourself an out.
  5. Make sure they see you.

If you follow these five keys of safety, you’re looking farther down the road. You’ll be prepared and have the time to change lanes or adjust your speed if needed. It’s also important to remember that others behind you may not be able to see what is coming up on the side of the road, so make your move to the next lane as early as you can, and make sure you signal your intentions. If you have to slow down, using your four-ways may be a good idea.

Use your expertise to talk to your friends and family members about this as well.

 

Remember; “Move Over,” it’s the law!