Archive for the ‘Safety’ Category

June 15th, 2015

 

Well drivers, it is finally summer. The sun is out and temperatures are rising across the country. This is great news. This means no run-ins with blizzards or patches of ice. But, it does mean that staying safe and healthy in the heat and the sun become top priorities.

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It is important to remember how harmful exposure to the sun can be. It doesn’t matter where or how you get a sunburn or tan; working in the yard, playing golf, laying outside or in a tanning bed, even just resting your arm on the driver’s side door while you are working. It’s bad news. Tans and sunburns are caused by harmful UV radiation from the sun. If you have a tan, you have damaged skin cells; it’s as simple as that.

This damage can lead to premature aging of your skin in the form of wrinkles, brown spots and sagging, or lax skin. And of course, overexposure to the sun may cause melanoma, a type of skin cancer. Studies show that over the past 40 years, cases of melanoma among people ages 18 to 39 have increased by 800 percent in women and 400 percent in men.

People at the greatest risk of overexposure are those who live in sunny climates or high altitudes, those whose jobs or favorite activities require them to spend significant amounts of time outdoors, a history of blistering sunburns as a child and, worst of all, repeated use of indoor tanning beds.

Happily, as in most things, a little common sense goes a long way. Skin damage from overexposure to UV rays can be prevented. Here are some tips to help you enjoy the warm weather without feeling the need to wrap yourself in a cocoon.

  1. Use a sunscreen that has been proven effective. Pick a broad-spectrum sunscreen that protects against UV-A and UV-B rays and that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15. And remember, the number here relates to the amount of time you may go between applications. A sunscreen with a protection factor of 15 blocks over 90 percent of the harmful UV rays, but would need to be reapplied more often than one with a factor of, say 100.
  2. Be sure to apply enough sunscreen — an ounce (about a handful) is generally enough to cover most exposed areas of your body. Use more if you want but don’t skimp! Apply it thoroughly and thickly.
  3. Be sure to cover all exposed skin. Get the backs of your ears, your shoulders and back, and the backs of your knees and legs. Avoid getting sunscreen in your eyes.
  4. If you plan on swimming (or sweating) look for a brand of sunscreen that is waterproof. Reapply as needed.
  5. Pay attention to the expiration date. The ingredients in sunscreen degrade over time.

These few simple steps can help you enjoy a safe, healthy summer, so apply that sunscreen and get out there and enjoy the beautiful summer weather as much as you can. And remember, just because you are in the cab of a truck, doesn’t mean you are necessarily safe from rays. Lather up!

 

 

June 8th, 2015

This Friday and Saturday, we will be sending 20 of our professional truck drivers to the Missouri State Truck Driving Championships; an annual statewide competition for the most skilled and safest truck drivers. This year’s competition is taking place, conveniently, in Joplin – just down the street from our headquarters.

State truck driving championships give professional truck drivers an outlet to showcase their driving talents, their knowledge of regulations and, most importantly, their safety skills. In order to qualify for the Missouri State Truck Driving Championships, drivers must be accident free in the past year, must be continuously employed by the same company, have a Missouri CDL and be employed as a full-time professional truck driver.

During the two-day long event, our drivers will take a written examination, compete in safety and skills tests based on their truck class and demonstrate pre-trip inspections — all judged by truck driving professionals and industry representatives from across the state. Truck classes include sleeper, straight truck, twin trailers, 3-axle, step van, flatbed, tank and 4- and 5-axle classes.

The winners from each class will join the best drivers from across the country at the National Truck Driving Championships, August 11-15 in St. Louis. Good luck to our Con-way Truckload Missouri STDC competitors!

  • Albert Arriola
  • Guy Barber
  • Pamla Blair
  • Darryl Bogan
  • Charles Branom
  • Bobby Chilcoat
  • William Church
  • Jerry Darby
  • Jason Edone
  • Jose Gonzalez
  • Melissa Hardwick
  • Brian Kinyon
  • Victor Martinez
  • Alexander Mosquera
  • Wayde Moxey
  • Virgil Pitchett
  • Greg Shaw
  • Ellen Stallibrass
  • Paul Stallibrass
  • William Yamasaki

For more information on the Missouri Truck Driving Championships, visit: http://www.motrucking.org/events/missouri-truck-driving-championships-2/, and be sure to stay in the loop about how our drivers place on Facebook, www.facebook.com/ConwayTruckload.

 

 

June 4th, 2015

If you have paid attention to the news lately, you might have noticed that a large portion of the country is experiencing flooding of some kind.

Flood waters can be extremely dangerous and have been known to roll boulders, destroy roads and obliterate bridges. Flash floods develop after about six hours of a rain storm, and depending on the intensity of the rain, severe flash floods can occur in a matter of minutes.

With the severe weather around the country, we wanted to remind everyone of some best practices when dealing with these situations.

Turn around, don’t drown

If you come to an area that is covered with water, it’s important to remember that you do not know the depth of the water or the condition of the road beneath it. The safest thing to do for yourself and those around you is to turn around and seek higher ground. It’s harder to see possible flood dangers at night so be extra cautious.

 Stay informed

Invest in an NOAA Weather Radio to stay informed of weather conditions in your area. If you have a smartphone you can choose from multiple apps, majority of the free, that will also provide weather information and updates. A NOAA Weather Radio app is available on iTunes for $3.99. In areas that are experiencing severe weather, the media typically will break onto the radio stations with regularly scheduled alerts. With all of these options available, staying informed is easy.

Know the terminology

A flash flood warning is issued when a flash flood is imminent or occurring. This means you need to take action now and seek higher ground.

A flood warning is issued when flooding is imminent or occurring. A flood watch means the conditions are favorable and flooding is likely to occur. Flood advisories are issued when flooding is likely to occur, but not severe enough to issue a warning.

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Floods bring geese.

 

It takes only two feet of moving water to carry away most vehicles and around four feet for semi-trucks. It’s important to remember that trying to drive in any amount of moving water is unsafe and you should always err on the side of caution.

Visit http://www.floodsafety.noaa.gov/ for more information.